MUI Corporation - Your Custom Construction Specialist








Are You Ready to Remodel
 

Certified Graduate Remodelor

About Being a Certified Graduate Remodelor
A home is the largest investment that most Americans will ever make. It's also one of the most important. Remodeling is a good way to enhance the value of your home. However, when it comes to adding a room or updating a kitchen, most consumers spend less time, and know less about, choosing a remodeler than choosing a car. This is why the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) Remodelors Council created the Certified Graduate Remodelor (CGR) program. The CGR designation helps you determine which remodeling contractor you can count on to do a professional job when faced with dozens of contractors all claiming to do good work.

Choose a Certified Graduate Remodelor!
The Certified Graduate Remodelor program assures you that your remodeler has met NAHB prescribed standards of business practice and has a proven track record of successfully completed projects. The CGR designation means that a remodeler has completed specific educational requirements, pledges to uphold the CGR Code of Ethics, and abide by the "Quality Standards for the Professional Remodeler." Because the CGR program emphasizes business management as the foundation of a successful remodeling company, all CGR's are required to take business-related courses offered by NAHB's educational arm, the Home Builders Institute.

All Certified Graduate Remodelors must have owned or managed a remodeling business for at least five years, and must be approved by a nine-member board of governors. Only individual remodelors can earn the CGR designation; CGR does not apply to companies or their employees. In addition, all CGR's must provide reference letters, proof of business insurance, and licensing information, (if required by state law), to the board before they are approved for certification.

NAHB and the Remodelors Council
As the largest and most influential trade organization in the building industry, the NAHB has worked for nearly 50 years to strengthen the professionalism of its members. The NAHB is recognized in the building industry as the leading advocate of quality construction, responsible business practices and reliable customer service.

The Remodelors Council, a division of NAHB, was founded in 1962 to serve the residential and commercial remodeling industry. The council provides information and education to improve the management and technical expertise of its members, supports their business interests at all levels of government and promotes professionalism in the industry.

"Remodelor" is a trademark which denotes NAHB members who are active in residential and commercial remodeling.

The NAHB Remodelors Council in no way guarantees workmanship, materials, or equipment. Certified Graduate RemodelorsTM are independent contractors and not agents, representatives or employees of the NAHB or the NAHB Remodelors Council.

Certified Graduate Remodelor Code of Ethics
All Certified Graduate Remodelors subscribe to a Code of Ethics based on professional workmanship and customer satisfaction.

They pledge to:

CONDUCT business affairs with professionalism and skill.
PROVIDE the best remodeling value possible. PROTECT the consumer through the use of high quality materials and remodeling practices backed by integrity and service.
MEET all of their financial obligations in a responsible manner.
COMPLY with the spirit and letter of their business contracts, and manage all employees, subcontractors, and suppliers with fairness and honor.
KEEP informed regarding public policies and other essential information which affect their business interests and those of the building industry as a whole.
COMPLY with the rules and regulations prescribed by law and government agencies for the health, safety and welfare of the community
PROVIDE timely response to items covered under warranty
SEEK to resolve any controversy which they may become involved in through a non-litigation dispute resolution mechanism.
REFRAIN from harming, either directly or indirectly, the professional reputation, practice, or employment of another remodelor.